Whole house filter gauge issues + Water softener configuration

A number of years ago when I became a homeowner, I had to replace a good portion of the plumbing around the hot water heater. At that time, we installed new pressure reducing valve (set to 70, I believe) at the main, followed by a bypass loop which goes through a mesh spindown filter and two 20x4.5 whole house filterhousings all on 1.5" piping. Each of the 20x4.5 housings has ports for pressure gauges on the inflow and outflow ports (pictures here). I have a few issues / questions on this setup. Correct method of refilling bypass loop I've never known the correct way to close and reopen the bypass for cleaning without introducing excess air into the house plumbing. Historically I've done the following: Open the bypass and close the loop valves Open the stage 1 drain, and open the stage 3 air bleed. Wait for it to finish draining, and remove / clean the housing / filter. Open the stage 2 drain, and open the stage 2 air bleed. Wait for it to finish draining, and remove / clean the housing. Open the stage 3 drain, remove and clean. Install the housings and filters back. close the drain valves, but leave the air bleeds wide open. Open the outflow valve on the loop to allow it to backfill, and close the air bleeds when they begin to spray water. Open the inflow valve, and close the bypass. I have a feeling this is not quite correct, as I still get sputtering at some of my faucets post-filter clean. Should I be opening the inflow first? Is there a better way to bleed the air out? Gauges incorrect on housings The gauges on each of the filters tends to be wildly wrong; sometimes outflow reports higher pressure than inflow, or is pegged to 90 (or something equally absurd). I'm wondering if this is likely caused by water hammer, or my method of backfilling the loop. Sometimes I can fix the gauges by removing them from the housing during cleaning and tapping them, and they seem to be OK for a bit, but inevitably they get pegged to high pressures. Installing a water softener I am planning to install a water softener at the same time I replace my water heater. I'm hoping to prevent any scale / sediment buildup from the get go. My question is whether it is worth having this on the filter loop-- which would mean the softener never sees unfiltered water, but the house sees hard water every 6 months when I clean the filter-- or whether I should have it downstream of the bypass loop and use the integral softener bypass. This would mean that any time I clean the filters, unfiltered water is hitting the softener. Essentially, I am not sure whether hard water in my plumbing / appliances is more of a cost / risk, or whether sediment in my softener is. Our water is not severely hard-- maybe 5-10grains/gallon-- nor is it signfiicantly dirty, though the mesh filter does capture a decent amount of sand / dirt over the months. I'm 2 months since my last cleaning and I can already see the lower 1/4 of the mesh is clogged with dirt. Getting another pressure reducer? Finally, this would mean that there are 4 filters in line with the house water downstream of the pressure reducing valve. I don't understand whether each of the filters is causing a net pressure drop according to their ratings. Should I be setting the whole house to something higher-- say 75psi-- and then have a pressure reducing valve post water-softener, so that pressure is constant regardless of whether the filters are getting clogged or I am bypassing? submitted by /u/Curious_Implement706 [link] [comments]

Whole house filter gauge issues + Water softener configuration

A number of years ago when I became a homeowner, I had to replace a good portion of the plumbing around the hot water heater. At that time, we installed new pressure reducing valve (set to 70, I believe) at the main, followed by a bypass loop which goes through a mesh spindown filter and two 20x4.5 whole house filterhousings all on 1.5" piping. Each of the 20x4.5 housings has ports for pressure gauges on the inflow and outflow ports (pictures here).

I have a few issues / questions on this setup.

Correct method of refilling bypass loop

I've never known the correct way to close and reopen the bypass for cleaning without introducing excess air into the house plumbing. Historically I've done the following:

  1. Open the bypass and close the loop valves
  2. Open the stage 1 drain, and open the stage 3 air bleed. Wait for it to finish draining, and remove / clean the housing / filter.
  3. Open the stage 2 drain, and open the stage 2 air bleed. Wait for it to finish draining, and remove / clean the housing.
  4. Open the stage 3 drain, remove and clean.
  5. Install the housings and filters back. close the drain valves, but leave the air bleeds wide open.
  6. Open the outflow valve on the loop to allow it to backfill, and close the air bleeds when they begin to spray water.
  7. Open the inflow valve, and close the bypass.

I have a feeling this is not quite correct, as I still get sputtering at some of my faucets post-filter clean. Should I be opening the inflow first? Is there a better way to bleed the air out?

Gauges incorrect on housings

The gauges on each of the filters tends to be wildly wrong; sometimes outflow reports higher pressure than inflow, or is pegged to 90 (or something equally absurd). I'm wondering if this is likely caused by water hammer, or my method of backfilling the loop. Sometimes I can fix the gauges by removing them from the housing during cleaning and tapping them, and they seem to be OK for a bit, but inevitably they get pegged to high pressures.

Installing a water softener

I am planning to install a water softener at the same time I replace my water heater. I'm hoping to prevent any scale / sediment buildup from the get go.

My question is whether it is worth having this on the filter loop-- which would mean the softener never sees unfiltered water, but the house sees hard water every 6 months when I clean the filter-- or whether I should have it downstream of the bypass loop and use the integral softener bypass. This would mean that any time I clean the filters, unfiltered water is hitting the softener.

Essentially, I am not sure whether hard water in my plumbing / appliances is more of a cost / risk, or whether sediment in my softener is. Our water is not severely hard-- maybe 5-10grains/gallon-- nor is it signfiicantly dirty, though the mesh filter does capture a decent amount of sand / dirt over the months. I'm 2 months since my last cleaning and I can already see the lower 1/4 of the mesh is clogged with dirt.

Getting another pressure reducer?

Finally, this would mean that there are 4 filters in line with the house water downstream of the pressure reducing valve. I don't understand whether each of the filters is causing a net pressure drop according to their ratings. Should I be setting the whole house to something higher-- say 75psi-- and then have a pressure reducing valve post water-softener, so that pressure is constant regardless of whether the filters are getting clogged or I am bypassing?

submitted by /u/Curious_Implement706
[link] [comments]